University of Wisconsin–Madison
College of Agriculture and Life Sciences | School of Medicine and Public Health

David Eide

Professor

eide@nutrisci.wisc.edu

608-263-1613

Nutritional Science
How cells and organisms survive and thrive under nutrient-deficient conditions

Address
340B Nutritional Sciences
Education
Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison (1987), Postdoctoral Research: MIT (1987-1990). University of Utah (1990-1991)
Department
Nutritional Science
Research Interests
We study mechanisms cells and organisms use to survive and thrive under nutrient-deficient conditions
Research Fields
Cell Biology, Gene Expression, Genomics & Proteomics, Fungi, Human, mouse & rat

Research Description:
Our research is focused on the mechanism of transition metal uptake in eukaryotic cells and how this process is regulated in response to changes in the availability of metal ions in the diet or the environment. We are using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system for understanding these processes in mammals and plants.

Questions our research are currently addressing include the following:

1. What transport proteins are responsible for the uptake of metals and their intracellular distribution in yeast and how do they work? We have identified metal uptake transporters in the plasma membrane and are currently searching for transporters involved in putting metals into mitochondria and the secretory pathway.

2. How is the activity of these transporters regulated in response to metal-deprivation and excess? We have identified both transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms and are studying how these systems work at the molecular level.

3. Can we use the reagents generated in our yeast studies to identify metal transporters from higher eukaryotes? Absolutely! We have identified metal transporters in plants and mammals that are related to the yeast proteins and we are currently studying their function and regulation.


Representative Publications:
Search PubMed for more publications by David Eide

Qiao, W., Ellis, C., Steffen, J., Wu, C., and Eide, D. Zinc status and vacuolar zinc transporters control alkaline phosphatase accumulation and activity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Mol. Microbiol. 72:320-34 (2009).

Wu, C., Roje, S., Sandoval, F., Bird, A., Winge, D., and Eide, D. Repression of sulfate assimilation is an adaptive response of yeast to the oxidative stress of zinc deficiency. J. Biol. Chem. 284:27544-56 (2009).

Wu, C., Steffen, J., and Eide, D. Cytosolic superoxide dismutase (SOD1) is critical for tolerating the oxidative stress of zinc deficiency in yeast. PLoS One 16;4(9):e7061(2009).

Eide, D.J. Homeostatic and adaptive responses to zinc deficiency in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. J. Biol. Chem. 284:18565-18569 (2009).

Atkinson, A., Khalimonchuk, O., Smith, P., Sabic, H., Eide, D., and Winge, D. Mzm1 influences a labile pool of mitochondrial zinc important for respiratory function. J. Biol. Chem. 285:19450-19459 (2010).

Frey, A.G. and Eide, D. J. The roles of Zap1’s two activation domains in the response to zinc deficiency in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. J. Biol. Chem. 286: 6844-6854 (2011).

Wu, Y., Frey, A., and Eide, D. J. Transcriptional regulation of the Zrg17 zinc transporter of the yeast secretory pathway. Biochem. J. 435: 259-266 (2011).

Frey, A., Bird, A., Evans-Galea, M., Blankman, E., Winge, D., and Eide, D. Zinc-regulated DNA binding of the yeast Zap1 zinc-responsive activator. PLoS One, 6:e22535 (2011).

Frey, A.G. and Eide, D. J. The roles of Zap1’s two activation domains in the response to zinc deficiency in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. J. Biol. Chem. 286: 6844-6854 (2011).

Wu, Y., Frey, A., and Eide, D. J. Transcriptional regulation of the Zrg17 zinc transporter of the yeast secretory pathway. Biochem. J. 435: 259-266 (2011).

Lim, P., Pisat, N., Gadhia, N., Pandey, A., Donovan, F., Stein, L., Salt, D., Eide, D., and MacDiarmid, C. Regulation of Alr1 Mg transporter activity by intracellular magnesium. PLoS One 6: e20896 (2011).

Frey, A., Bird, A., Evans-Galea, M., Blankman, E., Winge, D., and Eide, D. Zinc-regulated DNA binding of the yeast Zap1 zinc-responsive activator. PLoS One 6:e22535 (2011).

Frey, A. and Eide, D. Zinc-responsive coactivator recruitment by the yeast Zap1 transcription factor. MicrobiologyOpen 1:105-114 (2012).

North, M., Steffen, J., Loguinov, V., Zimmerman, G., Vulpe, C., and Eide, D. Genome-wide functional profiling identifies genes and processes important for zinc-limited growth to Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PLoS Genetics 8: e1002699 (2012).

Jeong, J., Walker, J. M., Wang, F., Park, J. G., Palmer, A. E., Giunta, C., Rohrbach, M., Steinmann, B., and Eide, D. Promotion of vesicular zinc efflux by ZIP13 and its implications for spondylocheiro dysplastic Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 109(51):E3530-8 (2012)

MacDiarmid, C., Taggart, J., Kerdsomboon, K., Kubisiak, M., Panasharoen, S., Schelble, K., and Eide, D.J. Peroxiredoxin chaperone function is critical for protein homeostasis in zinc-deficient yeast. J. Biol. Chem. 288, 31313-31327 (2013).

Eide, D.J. Bacillithiol, a new role in buffering intracellular zinc. Mol. Microbiol. 94:743-746. (2014).

Carvalho, S., Barreira, R., Shawki, A., Castro, H., Lamy, M., Eide, D., Costa, V., Mackenzie, B., Tomas, A. LiZIP3 is a cellular zinc transporter that mediates the tightly regulated import of zinc in Leishmania infantum parasites. Mol. Microbiol. 96:581-95 (2015).