Tu-Anh Huynh

Position title: Assistant Professor

Email: thuynh6@wisc.edu

Phone: 608-262-5960

Address:
Food Science
Bacterial signal transduction and pathogenesis, stress response, host-microbe interactions

Address
Office: 127A Babcock, Lab: 231A Babcock
Education
Ph.D., University of California-Davis, Postdoc at the University of Washington
Website
https://huynhlab.labs.wisc.edu/
Department
Food Science
Research Interests
Bacterial signal transduction and pathogenesis, stress response, host-microbe interactions
Research Fields
Gene Expression, Genomics and Proteomics, Bacteria and Other Microbes
Research Description:
The overarching goals of our lab are to understand bacterial pathogenesis and develop novel antibiotic treatments. Our main pathogen of interest is the human pathogen Listeria monocytogenes, an intracellular pathogen that replicates in mammalian cell cytosol, causing mortality in 20% of clinical cases. Specifically, we currently investigate: i) the function of cyclic dinucleotides in bacterial stress response, adaptation, and pathogenesis, ii) the pathogenesis of Listeria monocytogenes in the mammalian gastrointestinal tract, iii) the interactions of Listeria monocytogenes with environmental microbial communities, and iv) antimicrobial discovery
PubMed Link
Representative Publications:
Gall AR, Hsueh BY, Siletti C, Waters CM, Huynh TN (2021). NrnA is a linear dinucleotide phosphodiesterase with limited function in cyclic dinucleotide metabolism in Listeria monocytogenes. Journal of Bacteriology.
Massa SM, Amar SD, Siletti C, Tu Z, Godfrey JJ, Gutheil WG, Huynh TN (2020). C-di-AMP accumulation impairs muropeptide synthesis in Listeria monocytogenes. Journal of Bacteriology.
Huynh TN, Choi PH, Sureka K, Ledvina HE, Campillo J, Tong L, Woodward JJ. (2016). Cyclic di-AMP targets the cystathionine beta-synthase domain of the osmolyte transporter OpuC. Molecular Microbiology
Huynh, TN., Luo, S., Pensinger, D., Sauer, J.D., Tong, L., and Woodward, J.J. (2015). An HD-domain phosphodiesterase mediates cooperative hydrolysis of c-di-AMP to affect bacterial growth and virulence. PNAS